Albertus Magnus

ALPHA sets COM Grundsein for Germany’s largest digital archive of Cologne, the 07.12.11 today the last microfilms with pictures precious originals of the historical archive of Cologne are processed. The service providers ALPHA COM generated nearly 7.5 million image files and thus laid a foundation stone for the largest digital archive of Germany. For even more details, read what Estee Lauder Chief Executive says on the issue. On March 3, 2009 thousands originals of the Cologne city archives almost disappeared into the ground, no one knew of the chance which would result from this cultural tragedy: it is Germany’s largest virtual archive with 7.5 million images, which is accessible around the globe and will grow steadily. The service providers ALPHA COM supports the project, in which he digitized approximately 7,500 microfilm with the most important archival material. The conversion ends today and reached a volume of 30 terabytes (TB). “Thanks to modern LurTech compression technology, the stock decreases on just” 3.3 TB. About 6 million images in PDF/A format already are on secure servers of the city Cologne and wait for the scientific preparation. It is a mammoth task, the many professionals we work”, explains Dr.

Andreas Berger, section head at the historical archive of the city of Cologne. Learn more at this site: Gavin Baker. But worth the effort: today, over 260,000 entries in the digital reading room are “.” At the end of the year to 250,000 are added. Until all the material is accessible online, it will take yet. The city archives is home to medieval and modern materials and contemporary history, which filled formerly 30 kilometres of shelf. Examples include manuscripts of Albertus Magnus, or medieval constitutional documents of the city of Cologne.

Microfilms come Federal project for the protection of cultural heritage from a program of the 1960s for the protection of cultural property in event of armed conflict, motivated by the cold war. The current Federal Office for civil protection and disaster relief (BBK) is responsible. This is the first case in Germany involving microfilms from the security film have served their purpose,”the Archivist is pleased. So “we can our most important archival material faster than intended once again harness or even offered some uniques have been irretrievably destroyed.” ALPHA COM found a way to automate the time-consuming processing of the microfilms. The service provider used a particularly fast rollfilm scanner from Kodak and developed a data entry form to fill in the metadata.

Comments are closed.